Lighting

Deception on a grand scale, lighting industry admits

Deception on a grand scale, lighting industry admits

The lighting industry is deliberately misrepresenting the energy performance of home and office lighting on a grand scale, according to an official document that surfaced this week.

Most firms, including Osram, Philips and General Electric, are knowingly selling bulbs that are 10% less bright than declared on the packet (lumens), according to a statement filed with the World Trade Organisation by the European Commission.

Brussels plan to reintroduce wasteful lighting technologies

Brussels plan to reintroduce wasteful lighting technologies

The European Commission plans to allow highly inefficient, poor quality office and street light technologies back onto the market, reversing bans that have been in place for years. Offices could reintroduce lighting that is 15% darker and breaches European light quality and comfort standards. Street lighting could go backwards too, saving money in the short-term but reducing light quality and locking public authorities to higher energy bills for years.

Beyond VW — other firms deceiving their customers

Beyond VW — other firms deceiving their customers

At VW, what you see is not what you get. The same is true with home appliances. Firms are deliberately overstating the performance of their products through a legal loophole that could be costing consumers as much as €2bn a year. Reforms to close the loophole have been frozen by European Commission chiefs nervous of VW-like headlines.

- Manufacturers deliberately overstating product performance
- Whistleblower: the problem is endemic in the lighting sector
- Loophole could be costing consumers €2bn a year in higher energy bills
- European Commission sitting on a silver bullet legal reform
- Electrolux criticises Commission